December 5, 2016: 1. Fabulous antique applique quilts at NEQM! 2. Quilt making is dangerous! 3. Updates

Greetings!  This past Friday I went to the New England Quilt Museum in Lowell, MA (a convenient one hour drive from here) to see a FABULOUS exhibit of antique, mostly red, green, and white quilts from the Christ collection.  I was totally in quilt heaven and I strongly encourage anyone loving these traditional quilts to make a trip to see this “must see” exhibit before it closes at the end of the month.  Not only is the appliqué outstanding, but the hand quilting is amazing too.  Today I’m going to share 3 of my favorites with you and will share many more over the next several posts!

This one was probably my favorite.  I love the basket design with the berries (over 1500!!), but the quilting was astounding as well!!!  Be sure to click on the pics for enlargements/closeups:

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Even though the design on this next one is simple, it captured my attention and love.  I’m seriously thinking about trying to reproduce this one as I don’t think it would be difficult and I just love the overall effect.  Love those spiky leaves in the border and the cheddar color in the pomegranates!   This exhibit certainly makes me want to start a red, green and white appliqué quilt!

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I loved the overall visual effect of this “whig rose”.   I liked the size of the red centers and the use of pink in the flowers; also liked the primitive vine border.  There were 3 whig rose quilts in the exhibit and I think I liked this one the best though they were all great!

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I’ll share more next time, but do go see this very special exhibit if you can!  In addition to the appliqué quilts – there are some more recent ones that are not “red, green, and white” as well – there was an exhibit of smaller, wall quilts on the “spice” theme that were interesting and there was an exhibit of antique log cabin quilts in another room.  I have pictures from all these exhibits to share eventually, but, again, nothing beats seeing them in person if possible!

Meanwhile, the “Blue Star” special occasion quilt is finished!  I picked it up last Wednesday and had the binding done by this weekend.  We are now planning when to present the quilt to its recipient.  I think my closeup gives you a chance to see the nice ginkgo leaf/clamshell design the quilter used, which suits the quilt nicely:

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At the same time I picked up the “blue star” I took my neighbor’s “memory” quilt with me to the long arm quilter, Linda Bevins, to drop off for quilting.  I took my neighbor as well so he could pick out the quilting design and he loved meeting Linda and seeing her studio.  He was amazed at the size of her 2 long arm machines; I do think those that don’t know anything about quilting are very surprised at the size of the equipment for this type work.

I finally got the top for gift Baby Quilt #2 done, by adding the sashing and getting all the rows sewn together:

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I had enough of the sashing fabric to make the entire backing out of it and now it is ready to be layered and machine quilted.  I’m comfortable machine quilting a baby quilt, place mats, table runners, etc. with straight lines, ,but wouldn’t want to attempt anything more complicated!  The baby is due in early January so I am right on time!

I have also been working steadily on “Twinkle.”  I spent much of yesterday making the vines for the second border and hand appliquéing them on, making and appliquéing the center star, and making the leaves.  I have 3/4 of the leaves done – hand appliquéd – on the left border:

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Making quilts can be dangerous!  Over the years I’ve had numerous superficial burns from inadvertently touching my iron and I have occasionally nicked myself with the rotary cutter, but nothing that required any medical care.  I did something the other day that I have never before done in all my years of sewing – I inadvertently reached under the sewing machine needle while forgetting to take my foot off the pedal and the machine needle went right through the distal part of the nail and tip of my left second finger!  What a shock!   Luckily there was no needle stuck in the finger and I was able to stop the bleeding after after a few minutes.  It’s a little sore, but not bad and there’s no reason to think I won’t heal just fine.  On the same hand, just proximal to the thumb, I have a healing iron burn.  You can see the burn and the bandaid over the finger tip – I’m sparing you the gory details!:

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As is common with accidents, this happened because I was cutting corners.  I always pin! – but not this time!  This time I was sewing a seam and thinking I didn’t need to pin and because the edge of the 2 pieces of fabric was not as together as I wanted it as I sewed down the seam, I reached in to pull them closer together and that’s when I forgot to take my foot off the pedal.  Moral of the story – be mindful, and don’t cut corners!

Be kind, be grateful, and cherish each day,  Gladi

 

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10 thoughts on “December 5, 2016: 1. Fabulous antique applique quilts at NEQM! 2. Quilt making is dangerous! 3. Updates

  1. Mrs. Plum

    Poor you for those injuries! Hope they heal quickly. Thanks for an interesting post. I loved seeing all the quilts, but I especially love your Twinkle quilt.

    Reply
    1. gladiporsche Post author

      I’m sure I’ll be back to normal soon. Luckily because of the location of the injury, I can still hand sew. Glad you like Twinkle – it’s amazing to me that the blocks were a UFO for a few years before I was inspired to do something with them. Now I love it too! Gladi

      Reply
  2. Marie Tymrak

    Sure hope all injuries heal quickly. Your own quilts are quite inspirational for myself, one who adds appliqué only when necessary to enhance interest or color in areas that cannot be pieced. It is fun to see what inspires you! One has to call these rose-themed quilts “classic”, because they remain admired despite decades and more since their origination.

    Reply
    1. gladiporsche Post author

      Thank you so much, Marie! I agree that the quilts in the museum are “classics.” I aspire to make “classic” quilts myself – i.e. quilts that will hold their appeal for as long as they exist! That desire drives many of my decisions on what quilts to make. Gladi

      Reply
  3. Barbara robso

    I saw the exhibit at the NEQM a few weeks ago and loved it. I didn’t want to leave. Everyone should go and see it. They are all quite wonderful. The stitching is exquisite and so fine. I must tackle my pictures and post them. I was so pleased that they allowed photographs. Thanks for posting this!
    Barbara in Nova Scotia

    Reply
    1. gladiporsche Post author

      Glad you got to see the exhibit. I agree – I hardly wanted to leave either! Isn’t it great that we have quilt museums to show and preserve these masterpieces?! I hope the quilting community supports these museums so they can continue to bring us wonderful exhibits like this! Gladi

      Reply
  4. Wendy C. Reed

    Cyndi and I were supposed to go to the museum today to see these, but I had an unexpected work meeting. So, I am particularly thankful to you for posting these beauties. Your blue stars quilt is so beautiful I know the recipient will be over the moon! Your “Twinkle” borders are sensational. I do love that quilt. It has been on my “to do ” list for way too long, so I may never get to it. I am sorry to hear of your injury. I have done that only once and I did have to pull the needle out of my nail. I wish for a quick recovery! Have a great day.

    Reply
    1. gladiporsche Post author

      Hi Wendy. Make sure you do eventually get to the museum for this exhibit if at all possible because I know you will love it! Meanwhile, I’ll be posting lots more pictures soon. Thanks for the feedback on my quilts and for the wish for a speedy recovery! So far it’s not hindering me in any significant way. Gladi

      Reply
  5. Paul McKenna

    That is an interesting post, but we’re so sorry to hear about your work-related injury! The saying “physician heal thyself” will need to apply and you are, of course, in good hands! Take care of yourself…

    Reply
    1. gladiporsche Post author

      Thanks, Paul. I’m sure I’ll be fine. The injury is actually impacting my ability to play my accordion more than it is impacting my sewing! Hope you and family are all fine and am looking forward to seeing you and Lee in March!!! Gladi

      Reply

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